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Food on the water

PostPosted: 07 Feb 2020, 17:50
by peatop
Last year in the NSC welcome pack we got a box of food bars, these were a great source of energy while out on the water unfortunately they are out of my price range for how often im on the water, i tried other bars but felt they weren't upto the same standard, something thats been on my mind for a while has been dried fruit but rather exspencive, anyway i bought a food dryer then some bananas, a mango and tomatoes, this was my test batch that i took to our xmas lunch to test the poison on the kids :lol: they demolished the mango liked the banana and didn't really touch the tomatoes lol damn poison was in the wrong one :lol: a new fruit shop opened last year just down the road from my daughters and the other day she was in there and found a box containing 30 mangoes for $10 she contacted me and we went halves.
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today i had to head over that way and thought i had better call in for a look $5 for yhe mangoes $7 for the mixed fruit, nectarines, peaches and a few one offs these i intend to dry some and put some into the blender to then dry into rollups has anyone else done this as power food for kayaking or some other activity?

Oh btw the dryer can also make meat jurcky :evilgrin: wonder how honey and soy marinated fish jurcky tastes.

Re: Food on the water

PostPosted: 07 Feb 2020, 21:50
by Justo
If you can make it in to the city on a Sunday arvo, you can get incredible bargain fruit at the Vic Market from around 2:00 onward. Perfect for dehydrating too - the ripe stuff is marked down because it has to be consumed soon.

The meat gets marked down also. I use topside for jerky.

Re: Food on the water

PostPosted: 08 Feb 2020, 08:26
by cheaterparts
peatop wrote:Last year in the NSC welcome pack we got a box of food bars, these were a great source of energy while out on the water unfortunately they are out of my price range for how often im on the water


bit high in Carbs for me - same with dried fruit - I rarely eat while on the water anyway and really can go all day without thinking of food while fishing - I don't see the need to spike my blood sugars to pick up energy -- but I have at times taken a couple of boiled eggs

boiled chook bum nuts are a better option than high carb/sugar and easy to store on the kayak --- https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/6- ... the-planet

but don't get me started on the high fat low carb thing - it costs to much doing that by having to buy skinnier clothing

Re: Food on the water

PostPosted: 08 Feb 2020, 13:10
by peatop
Justo wrote:If you can make it in to the city on a Sunday arvo, you can get incredible bargain fruit at the Vic Market from around 2:00 onward. Perfect for dehydrating too - the ripe stuff is marked down because it has to be consumed soon.

The meat gets marked down also. I use topside for jerky.

Yes vic market is an awesome place for cheap food unfortunately i live over 100km from there :cry: the tradeoff for living the life lol
cheaterparts wrote:
peatop wrote:Last year in the NSC welcome pack we got a box of food bars, these were a great source of energy while out on the water unfortunately they are out of my price range for how often im on the water


bit high in Carbs for me - same with dried fruit - I rarely eat while on the water anyway and really can go all day without thinking of food while fishing - I don't see the need to spike my blood sugars to pick up energy -- but I have at times taken a couple of boiled eggs

boiled chook bum nuts are a better option than high carb/sugar and easy to store on the kayak --- https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/6- ... the-planet

but don't get me started on the high fat low carb thing - it costs to much doing that by having to buy skinnier clothing
Eggs eggs and more eggs couldn't agree more, i had a slight cholesterol problem the doctor printed of a list of foods good and bad, i looked at it and said :wtf: is life worth living if all the foods i enjoy are removed from my diet? She looked at me in silence for a while then just said do what you can, although since changing my habits and reducing my levels i threw that printout in the bin.

I remember as some of you guy around my age will that eggs have been good for you, then bad for you on and off all my life, same goes for other natural products like milk, nuts even fruit. But why is it in then out? Properganda? Anyway although i like eggs there are only curtain ways i enjoy them, but boiled is one and i hadn't thought about them to be honest, the idea of fruit wasn't just by itself it was to be just part of the idea, sometimes if I've been out for a long time i want to keep going but i feel drained and need something to keep me going, another thought I've considered is a camp cooker and small frypan (very doable on the PA) for a quick feed on the water, don't laugh it has been done :lol: but yeah eggs would make a good addition to my snack pack :thumbsup:

Re: Food on the water

PostPosted: 08 Feb 2020, 14:10
by flyonline
I do dried fruit and leather every year as we've got a stack of fruit trees. Personally, I love blood plum fruit leather the best, followed by dried apricots and peaches (plus, my naturopath told me to eat more dried apricots as they're high in Iron, and I'm low :yahoo: ).

I do whole peaches/nectarines a couple of ways, big fruit I just slice off a good slab, then fillet around the pip to get 2x similar size slices. Small stuff I just fillet around the pip (as for a mango) and dry the whole piece. Apricots just get done in halves. We also have a cherry plum that doesn't taste all that great but ripens early so I experimented this year boiling the fruit whole to remove the pips (bugger to get them out by hand!) and added some blood orange juice which came out excellently, almost as good as the blood plum fruit leather. Don't add any sugar to fruit leather, it should be sweet enough as is, but I do soak the fruit pieces in a Citric acid solution for 15-30min to stop them browning as much and a sprinkle to fruit leather when cooking.

Fruit leather I boil quickly anything that's going in, then blitz with a stick blender until pureed. Originally I dried it on silicon baking sheets but I've since tried greased baking paper which seems to dry quicker - these often get inserted between trays of halved fruit when they've shrunk a bit. I've also cooked them and bottled/frozen for drying later in the year (or warmed over ice-cream :thumbsup: ).

Once dried, I vac bag them into little pouches using the salami tubes, and they last for ages. Had some the other day that were over a year old and still fine. Nearly always have a couple of pouches in my hunting/fishing/work bag as a backup in case I forget lunch and they go great in kids lunch boxes or emergency "I'm hungry" in the car.

Re: Food on the water

PostPosted: 08 Feb 2020, 14:21
by 4liters
Just gnaw into a bit of fresh yakka sashimi, or whatever else comes up on the sabiki rig

Re: Food on the water

PostPosted: 08 Feb 2020, 22:27
by peatop
4liters wrote:Just gnaw into a bit of fresh yakka sashimi, or whatever else comes up on the sabiki rig
i tried this in my favorite ting spot but toadies taste like shet :lol:

Thanks for that information steve, yeah it's amazing stuff and perfect for the kids in the car when on a trip or picking up from somewhere and a bit peckish, what sort of dehydrator do you use, mines a cheap pickup from aldi but already thinking about buying another better quality and extra trays available if wanted :thumbsup:

Re: Food on the water

PostPosted: 09 Feb 2020, 07:46
by flyonline
I've got an excalibur 4500 (5 tray basic model) https://www.excaliburdehydratorsaustralia.com/. Not cheap, but it works really well, though I would get a 9 tray if I could afford it as doing big stonefruit halves I can only fit 2-3 trays in at a time. It's worth the extra for a timer, I don't like running it when I'm not there but will put the timer on so I don't forget and over dry, or let it run an hour or two extra after I've gone to bed etc.

I've also proofed bread and made jerky in it and a work collegue who does some serious 4wd also makes his own dehydrated meals which I will have a go at when I get a chance. They also extend their fruit leather with a bit of apple, but I've never bothered because we've got an excess of fruit each year, but I would like to try those caramel apple rings one day.

Just a tip, don't bother drying watermelon - it just tastes like concentrated dried watermelon which is not as nice as it sounds :lol:

Forgot I'd soaked some in some water/honey mixture a few years ago and they came out great and I'd suggest they'd last even longer from the anti-whatever from the honey. They did look a little funny though with crystals of honey hanging off almost like mold. Tasted good too :up:

Re: Food on the water

PostPosted: 09 Feb 2020, 18:39
by peatop
Mine has 5 trays and it's taking ages to do just one box of fruit but hey it's worth it, i used to bottle years ago and thought i would start again but then i came across dehydrating :yahoo: